Tuesday, April 25, 2006

Broccoli & Brioche

It's so nice having a mom that cooks as much as I do. I call her out of the blue and ask, "Mom, do you know where I can get some tiny brioche pans?" "Sure," she says. "I've got a few dozen, what size do you want?"
I veganized a standard recipe for brioche (an eggy, buttery yeast bread from northern France) by substituting almond milk for milk and Earth Balance for butter. My favorite egg substitute in yeast breads is 2 TB mashed potatoes (per egg) and a pinch of turmeric (for color). I love the soft tenderness that mashed potatoes give to bread dough. In the thermos is some Broccoli Cheez Soup, one of our favorite recipes from Jo Stepaniak's Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook. For dessert, an apple and half a Newman's Own Sweet Dark Chocolate bar.
Verdict: The brioche was so buttery, light, and soft! I hope someone is working on a vegan french cookbook (Mastering the Art of Vegan French Cooking? What would Julia Child say?) All but a few bites of soup were gone. 5 stars.

38 comments:

Jane M said...

You never fail to surprise! Brioche! Hmmm, I nominate you to write that Mastering the Art of Vegan French Cooking....after all your off to a good start what with croissants and now brioche! Like you don't have enough to do, right?

That lunch looks really good. About how much does the thermos hold? I have the lunchbox but haven't gotten around to the thermos yet.

papillonVT said...

Fresh new lunch as always!

Will the brioche be in the cookbook?

Jennifershmoo said...

It's a 10 oz. thermos -- just about a cup. I've found that's just about the right amount for a good serving of soup for a kid. The lunch jar that Laptop sells is about twice that size.

JAMS59 said...

I can only imagine what the French would think of a vegan cookbook. When I lived in France, I had to constantly explain that I couldn't eat any kind of meat -- usually, people assumed I was insane. One waiter told me that I needed to get over my narrow -mindedness and eat some kind of meat at least.

Lady Di said...

I have the original uncheese cookbook...How does the ultimate differ? Is it worth having both?

Catherine said...

I think that, as long as everything tasted great, (which it would, of course,) Julia would give "Mastering the Art of Vegan French Cooking" two thumbs up! She always seemed game for anything!

I've made a vegan bechamel before -- I'd be happy to contribute. :)

Megan the Vegan said...

Brilliant brioche. I miss brioche SO SO much.
I've never heard of mashed potatoes as an egg replacer. I can see how that would work!

Sweet Pea said...

I think it's great that you're "veganizing" food so that Shmoo and yourself don't miss out.

Jams59, comments such as the one that the waiter said to you are so common when you don't eat meat. However, in my readings regarding health and nutrition I have come across many Italians who don't eat meat because of health reasons. I think vegetariansism is more common then many people think.

VLyandra said...

Oh man, vegan brioche! That sounds absolutely fantastic! How do you mash the potatoes for the egg replacer? Just boil/cook, and mash? Or do you add something to them?

Jennifershmoo said...

Yep, just boil, drain, and mash with a fork. Although you could use leftover mashed potatoes made with margarine and nondairy milk, if you had some.

Wide Lawns Subservient Worker said...

Its true the french would be horrified, but I, however, am not. The brioche looks delicious. I love that you put the little ball on top. I hope you will share this recipe with us. If not, please finish the book so I can buy it!!

kara said...

i created a blog on here just to post this haha.
have you tried "a vegan taste of france"?? they have it on amazon. i have the india one and it is really good!
also, i'm a huge fan of your blog! i read it everyday!
xoxox

Kimson said...

Julia Child would be proud!

K.S. said...

Not sure how authentic this vegan French cookbook is, but I figure for nine bucks, I'll probably get around to buying it some day.

Kate said...

I didn't know vegans could eat yeast. What's the rationale behind that?

NightOwl said...

Hey, let's not be so hard on the French! After all, they're the ones holding the Veggie Pride Fest every year in Paris. http://www.veggiepride.org/en/
That brioche looks to die for! Thank you so much for making it Jennifer! What a great idea. I'm just proud because I made vegan scones for the first time today.

Kimson said...

Yeast are a microscopic, single-celled fungi that rapidily reproduce in contact with water and sugar producing ethanol and carbon dioxide, so nothing animal related is in it at all.

SusanV said...

LOL--Julia Child had nothing but disdain for vegetarianism, so I'm sure she must have thought that veganism was an insidious affront to everything she held dear. I say go for it! Rewrite her book in vegan form, and let's all listen closely for the sound of her turning over in her grave!

Bryanna Clark Grogan said...

You said it, Susan! Julia vigorously defended the production and use of veal, as well.

Lady T said...

That Julia defended the use of veal is very very sad. Even when I was an omni I couldn't eat veal. Bryanna, would you remember offhand what her justification/reasoning behind it's use was?

Cat said...

There is a vegan French blog called Cuisinez vegetalien. It is in French but I enjoy the challenge of translating the recipes.

Catxx

baie rose said...

It's exist a french recipes books write by a non-profit vegan organization with more 250 recipes.
In french of coarse :)

http://avis.free.fr/livret_278_recettes.pdf

Katie said...

Jennifer,
My 13 year old daughter is a big fan of your blog. She discovered it while reading my blog and now she's hooked. She comes home from school and wants to see what Schmoo had for lunch. She says your upcoming cookbook is a must have!

Thanks for inspiring her.

R2K said...

You know there is a similar page out there to this one, I send the guy your link...

R2K

Vegetarian Cooker said...

Broccoli? It's good food.
I like this broccoli salad

Bryanna Clark Grogan said...

Lady t: in an interview in the September 2003 issue of Gourmet magazine, Julia Child described her likes and dislikes. Among the dislikes was "humanely raised veal." Ms Child didn't find the tenderness or milk-fed taste in humanely raised veal. To a person schooled in taste and texture, hrv doesn't make the grade, she said.

Here is a quote from one of her books: "Today, both in this country and abroad, top-quality professionally raised veal is nurtured on milk and milk by-products under carefully-controlled conditions..." Julia Child from In Julia's Kitchen with Master Chef's (Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1995)

Of course, we know what those "contolled conditions" really are.... or if you don't, go to http://www.freefarmanimals.org/

Emily said...

Funny enough, I just signed up to take a French vegetarian class. Obviously not the same as vegan but interesting nonetheless!

Jennifershmoo said...

>>have you tried "a vegan taste of france"?? they have it on amazon.

Thanks, Kara! I had never seen that before. It looks like the author has put out a whole series of books.

>>Will the brioche be in the cookbook?

No, I just picked a brioche recipe at random and veganized it in the way I described.

>>I have the original uncheese cookbook...How does the ultimate differ? Is it worth having both?

I only have "Ultimate", so I can't compare. I believe it's got some new recipes and improvements along with most of the original recipes.

Dan said...

I'm not vegan, but vegetarian, and I'm linking you Vegan Rockstar.

SusanV said...

Speaking of French vegan blogs, there's Absolutely Green by Virginie, who lately has started providing English translations for her recipes.

lola coca-cola said...

I am an omnivore (though was vegan for a few yearsa dn vegetarian for many more). But, I look at your blog every couple of days because it is so gorgeous. I love to eat vicariously. And it's so wonderful that you lovingly prepare your child's lunches. Good for you!

Miss Kitty said...

Mon dieu! Zees French feeling zat has come overr moi ees somezing else!

Sorry, the Frenchness of the brioche hit me right out of the blue. What an excellent idea--I'd never thought of mashed potatoes as an egg substitute. Vive le difference!

[ahem] I'm all right now. I can hear the corny TV ads now: "Mom...do you ever get that not-so-French feeling?"

Mom said...

I love seing all these yummy lunches and the lunchbox is so cool. I came very close to buying several of the lunchboxes the other day when my dear husband reminded me that I don't actually pack lunches for anyone (as my kids are too young for school)! What a party pooper! Ha! Ha!

Thanks for the fun, informative blog.

Cathe Olson said...

I just bought the Ultimate Uncheese Cookbook and was wondring what to try first. The broccoli-cheez soup sounds like a good one to start with.

I made the red lentil soup from Vegan Family Favorites last night for supper and my daughters absolutely raved (and it was so easy). They had it for lunch again today.

Oksana said...

The brioche was so buttery, light, and soft! I hope someone is working on a vegan french cookbook (Mastering the Art of Vegan French Cuisine? What would Julia Child say?) All but a few bites of soup were gone.
I've met some vegan French cooking recipes, so it's really possible that someone will write such a book.

red said...

thank you



chat sohbet muhabbet

lacrima_lamiae said...

just discovered your blog when googling "vegan brioche" and i'm quite done in by your way of handling it :)
i was just wondering - as you served the brioche (what are they called? muffins?) with soup - ae they sweet?
because in austria, where i'm from, brioche is quite common as well, but solely as some kind of sweet bread - cake.
i want to try making them sweet with vanilla and sugar, but doesn't that clash with the turmeric?

thanks so much :)

Jennifershmoo said...

Yes, this is definitely a sweet bread! But still so yummy with a cheese soup! And you really can't taste the turmeric at all -- it's only there for color.